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Polestar 2 cup holder

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Creation's quality: 3.5/5 (3 votes)
Evaluation of members on the printability, utility, level of detail, etc.
  • 4.8k views
  • 11 likes
  • 85 downloads

3D model description

Owners of the Polestar 2 knows that the cup holders are less than ideal. If you want to have the armrest in the forward position, neither of the two cup holders can be used. The rear cup holder is practically useless anyways, and if you were to use it, you'd have to contort your body to even reach it.

So I decided to create an alternative. I chose to use the lid of the glovebox as the anchor point, as it has a firm locking mechanism, and has been designed to take some weight (there's even a foldable hook that can take 2 kg).

My cup holder has been designed to hang over the top edge of the glovebox lid towards the center console, and when the lid is closed, it cannot come loose. It is thin enough to not be pinched when the lid is closed, but if you want it to be, you can add some foam tape to the top part of the hook. It is also possible to move it to the other side of the glovebox, but the curvature of the lid is slightly different there, so it doesn't fit 100%. Still useable, though.

There is also a bracket/hook that allows the cup holder to be attached on the center console edge, with the cup on the inside. This will impede/block usage of the screen somewhat, but in some cases one might prefer this location. I would advice to perhaps put a small piece of sticky tape to the inside of this bracket to ensure it stays in place, but it does clip over the console edge with some force, so decide for yourself. See image for approximate position, but there is some flexibility as to where to place it along the console edge, as the curvature is fairly consistent. There is one bracket for the left side of the console, and one for the right (one is a mirror of the other).

There are two versions of the cup holder, the original version which can hold cups or bottles with an outer diameter of 69 mm or less, which equates to roughly 2.7", and then there is a larger version which is tapered (like many soft drink and coffe-to-go cups), where the bottom inside diameter is 72 mm (2.80 ") and the top inside diameter is 86 mm (3.38 "). The height is 67 mm (2.63 "). To check if your favourite cup will fit, measure the diameter at the base and 67 mm up from the base, and check against the size of the cup holder. For cylindrical items (like cans and bottles), they must not exceed 72 mm in diameter.

This larger version will be too large for many smaller cups, so there are also reducer rings available, three fixed size and one that is adaptive. These reducers are snap fits inside the top edge of the cup holder, and can easily be removed if the full capacity is needed. The fixed reducers comes with these inner diameters:

  • 82 mm (3.22 ")
  • 78 mm (3.07 ")
  • 74 mm (2,91 ")

The adaptive reducer varies between 76 mm (3 ") and down to 49 mm (1. 92"). If your cups are not too large for the adaptive reducer, then that will be the preferred choice, since it also grips the cup and keeps it stable.

When not in use, it can be conveniently stored in the (useless) rear cup holder of the car, and it only takes seconds to pull it out and mount it, ready for service. Note that for the larger version, the hook/bracket needs to be removed to store it here

3D printing settings

This is mainly a two part design, because to maintain strength, the hook part needs to be printed in a different direction to the cup part. Basically, it has been specifically designed to be FDM printer friendly, but for those that have printers where orientation isn't key to maintain strength, a one piece design is also available. Two different visual styles are also available, one with holes that are elliptical, and the other with diamond-shaped holes. Pick the one you like best, functionally there is no difference.

Some supports are needed for the hook/bracket, as shown in the picture. For FDM, print the two part design in the orientation shown, and make sure to add supports to the hook/bracket part in the area indicated. The fit between the two parts is fairly tight, so be prepared to do a little bit of sanding to fit them together. No glue is necessary (even if the fit is loose, it will hold itself together by gravity when mounted in the car), but feel free to add a small dab of glue if you want to.

You can print the cup and the bracket with whatever layer height you want, I used 0.3 mm to save some time (the largest part took around 3 hours to print), but you will of course get a nicer finish if you use for example 0.2 mm.

The adaptive reducer ring have been designed specifically to be printed at 0.2 mm layer height due to the print-in-place hinges for the flaps, so if you print with a different layer height, you may not be able to free up the hinged flaps. Make sure to print with enough perimeters to avoid infill in the flaps. For the fixed reducer rings, you can print with a lower number of perimeters and a low infill to save on plastic.

The adaptive reducer ring uses a common rubber band as the spring mechanism, and a suitable size is around 40 mm (size 10 to 12) in diameter (unstretched). After printing, the flaps must be broken free and wiggled until they move freely, and then the thin support wall at the outside must be removed to allow for the rubber band to enter the channel inside the edge of the flap. This video describes the process in detail:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIVrE5PjALM

Important: All of the reducer rings have small bumps along the outer circumference that allows them to snap fit to the cup. There is one small bump for each of the cutouts in the cup, so make sure to rotate it so the one spot without a bump is oriented towards the back (where there is no cutout due to the bracket attachment).

Keep in mind that if you print in PLA, deformation is a possibility if left in the sun inside the car, as it can get really hot. And also very important:

Do not overload the cup holder. The bigger version will probably hold even big size drink cups, and I will in no way be held accountable for any spillage or burns caused by the cup holder breaking (for any reason).

Here's a video showing how to mount it in the car (only shows the original small version):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NFyBeVw40DA

Note: If you purchase these files, you only have the right to make copies for personal use. You may not create copies for others.

Changelog:
- May 9. 2021: Added new visual style with diamond shaped holes
- May 14. 2021: Added bracket for center console edge
- May 18. 2021: Added new and larger version with a choice of reducer rings

  • 3D file format: STL
  • Last update: 2021/05/18 at 18:07
  • Publication date: 2021/04/11 at 18:48

Tags

Creator

Designs 15
Downloads 155
Sales US$928
Followers 8

Electronics hardware engineer by education, working as a software engineer.

Self-taught in 3D-design, and now fairly skilled at designing all kinds of items for 3D-printing.

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9 comments

Awesome, thank you.

@snosurf: I have now added a new and bigger version of the cup holder, and the Yeti cup should be an exact fit (without any reducer ring).

Yup that’s the one. Yeti is pretty popular in the US.

This is great, thanks so much for taking this on. I’ll definitely recommend your designs to the Polestar space in Boston when I pick up my P2.

Hi,

Yes, flexible prongs is a possibility, and I have been thinking about something along those lines. A base diameter of 8.5 cm is quite large, and that means weight could start to become an issue, as it would accomodate quite large containers. A full 20 oz Yeti would weigh close to a full kg (or 35 oz), which I think would be quite close to what I'd no longer be comfortable with for this design. I'll see what I can do. Doing a special version for the Yeti tumbler is also possible (with a curved taper). The shape and size is published on their web site, so I could design from that. Is that a very popular coffe mug in the US? We're talking about this one, right:

https://www.yeti.com/en_US/drinkware/tumblers/20oz/YRAM20.html

Thanks for getting back to me about the cup size. Ideally it would fit a base diameter of 8.5cm (for a Yeti 20oz tumbler). Could a cup holder design include 3-4 flexible prongs that project inward to help buffer the different sized cups?

Hi,

The "one piece" version should only be used for resin/SLA or SLS printing. For FDM the two-piece version is the way to go. PETG or ABS should be fine, but PLA will most likely become too soft on a hot summer day in a car, so avoid that.

Hi, thinking of ordering this from Craftcloud or similar. Do you have a suggestion for which material to print it in? Eg. might PETG make the "one piece" one more sturdy?

That is possible, and I have been looking at it. However, there are so many sizes of cups and mugs that it is difficult to accomodate all, at least without some mechanism that expands and contracts.

What specific kind of coffee mug (exact size) are you thinking about? For example, coffe cups from Starbucks etc are tapered, and I am aware that these will not fit well in the current design.

Can you design a slightly larger cup holder that would hold a coffee mug?


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