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3D Periodic Table

3D model description

This a rotary cylindrical periodic table with hexagonal patterns (That reminds to a carbon nanotube), where each element show its abbreviation, mass and atomic weight, therefore, it is very useful and didactic, as well as artistic.

You can see the 3D model in real time here: http://a360.co/2lu27wQ
And here, my disposition of colors: http://a360.co/2DEzm83
Watch this video to see the finished model: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0B7zKwwB8DA
And this to know about the idea of assembly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d52YoaQfFIk

If you like this design, please let me know.

------ INSTRUCTIONS -----
If you want to print this, to clarify possible doubts, you must first read all the following information:

----- Body -----
• For some printers, printing the hexagonal pattern can be a bit difficult without supports. If you print it on PLA with a lot of ventilation, there should be no problems. I use a layer height of 0.3 mm, 100% layer fan and only support for a specific part (see attached images). I include a STL called "Test" to see if your printer will be able to correctly print the body of the periodic table with its patterns, if you have doubts.
• Important: You have to join the Honey Body Bottom and Honey Body Bottom top in the correct position, in the images you can see a suggestion for you to guide.
• To join the two parts of the body, I recommend first sanding the contact surface a little. Then apply a glue. In my case, I used a glue called "La gotita" (that is the name of the glue in my country, but I know that also it is known like cyanoacrylate or super glue) with sodium bicarbonate. This combination generates a very strong union.

----- Ball Bearing -----
• I designed the ball bearing to be printed with a layer height of 1.75 mm, so it is better to respect it.
• I recommend printing it with a speed equal or lower than 50 mm/s.
• It includes a support that ensures that it prints well. It must be easy to remove. The ball bearing work well.

----- Elements -----
• Each element is joined by pressure.
• Before printing all the elements, it is a good idea to print a test and see that they fit well in the hexagonal pattern. Depending on your printer, a small scale may be necessary to fit securely. For example, in my case, I had to scale them on the x and y axis by 100.3% (0.3% larger in those axes) , and with that, they fit very well by pressure.
• You can find the elements ordered in groups in the uploaded files.
• You can choose the colors you want. In my case, I gave colors respecting the visible electromagnetic spectrum, and because I did not have an extra color to the halogens (it would have been great to print them of dark blue and the noble gases of violet), I included them inside the nonmetals group.
• The filament change technique allows the hexagon to have a color, and the element abbreviation, mass and atomic weight, another color, which generates a contrast that allows distinguishing it better. Since my printer is a “Prusa MK2” I use the page https://www.prusaprinters.org/color-print/ to do the filament change. I do not know if this method works for other printers, but you have other options:
* Using Simplify3D (I don’t know methods for other slicers)
Watch this video and read its description: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OiixypnOS8o
* Manually:
It is more tedious, but you can pause the impression and change the filament, at the desired moment.

3D printing settings

Diameter: 199.4 mm
Total height (full assembly): 324 mm

  • 3D model format: STL and ZIP

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License

CC BY NC SA

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How did you print the symbol in the base a different color?