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Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head

Download 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesignDownload 3D printing files Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head, biglildesign

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3D model description

Hello Makers,

The Mold for Concrete Low Poly Head includes two STL files: Mold_L and Mold_R. This was a fun project but before starting, I recommend you read the 3D model description and 3D print settings. Also refer to all the attached photos.

In addition to having a 3D printer and filament, below is a list of tools/products that I used to make the Concrete Low Poly Head:

  1. Quikrete Vinyl Concrete Patcher
  2. Vegetable Oil
  3. Polymer Clay (non air-dry)
  4. Water
  5. Q-Tips
  6. Paper Towels
  7. Stainless Steel Bowl
  8. Small Bowl
  9. Blue Tape & Scissor
  10. Silicone Spatula
  11. Putty Knife (not shown in the photos)
  12. Rubber Mallet (not shown in the photos)
  13. Sandpaper - 200-300 grit (not shown in the photos)

Before starting, please read the important notes listed below:

  • Read concrete manufacturer's instructions.

  • I recommend mixing / pouring concrete in a well-ventilated area.

  • For this project, I recommend buying the stainless steel bowl, small bowl, and silicone spatula at your local thrift store. After using these items for this project, I do NOT recommend reusing for kitchen & cooking use.

  • Preparation is key for this project but clean up is an important step as well.

  • After pouring the concrete into the 2-part mold, immediately wipe clean the tools used for this project and table surface with paper towel and water.

  • Discard used tape, Q-tips, and other disposal items in a garbage bag.

  • Use the spatula to scoop out the unused mixed concrete into the garbage bag.

Okay, now you are ready to start. Listed below are the steps I took for this project:

  1. 3D print the 2-part mold > refer to 3D Printing Settings and attached photos showing correct orientation on the build plate.

  2. Using Q-Tips or paper towel, apply vegetable oil onto the interior surfaces ONLY that make up the low poly head. Do not apply vegetable oil where the polymer clay will be layed out and the exterior walls of the mold. It will be difficult to lay polymer clay and tape if there is vegatable oil on the surface. Refer to attached photos.

  3. Take a small chunk of polymer clay and roll it with your fingers and/or palm to create a long, worm-like part. Lay this part along the recessed channel. Refer to attached photos.

  4. Join the 2-part mold together and squeeze as much as you can to minimize the gap seams between the 2 parts. Look inside the mold and make sure you do not see any polymer clay. If you do, pull out the mold and remove the excess clay and re-join. Refer to attached photos.

  5. Apply tape on the exterior walls especially along the gaps. Refer to attached photos. This tape will help prevent the mixed concrete from spilling out and also hold the two molds together when the concrete has been poured in. Refer to attached photos.

  6. Scoop concrete into stainless steel bowl and then pour water. Please read concrete mixing instructions and/or watch videos on how to mix concrete. Note that I used Quikrete Vinyl Concrete Patcher for this project.

  7. Slowly pour concrete into the mold. When the mold has been filled to about 85%, swirl concrete around and also tap the outer walls. Tapping the walls will help eliminate air bubbles. Pour concrete all the way to the top surface and then continue tapping the walls for approximately 2-3 minutes until you stop seeing air bubbles rise to the top surface.

  8. If you printed the 2-part mold at 100% scale, I recommend to wait 2 full days to allow the concrete to dry.

  9. When the concrete has dried, use a putty knife to help split open the 2-part mold. Use your hands to completely separate the molds. Refer to attached photos.

  10. Once you have removed one side of the 2-part mold, carefully and slowly pull the Concrete Low Poly Head from the other mold. You may want to use a rubber mallet to help remove the concrete part by hitting the exterior wall of the 3D printed mold.

Optional:

  1. If you plan to reuse the 2-part mold, use the putty knife to scrape out the polymer clay and bits of concrete stuck on the molds.

  2. Use sandpaper (200 - 300 grit) on the concrete part to improve surface quality. Use an old toothbrush to brush away the sanded concrete from the part. I recommend doing this in a well-ventilated area.

  3. Spray clear coat (for concrete / masonry) to make the Concrete Low Poly Head more durable.

Enjoy and happy 3D printing! If you have any questions, follow me on Instagram @wesleymillora and send me a DM.

3D printing settings

  • The 2-part molds were printed on a Creality Ender 3 with Hatchbox PLA Cool Grey.

  • Ultimaker Cura 4.5 > Refer to attached photos showing correct orientation of the STL on the build plate.

  • Standard Quality / 0.20mm Layer Height

  • Printing Temperature: 210 / Build Plate Temp: 60

  • Print Speed: 60

  • Infill: 20

  • Recommendation: Brim / 4mm width

  • 3D file format: STL

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